5 year-old schoolgirl told to remove wig over health and safety fears

Mum left furious after 5 year-old daughter was told by teachers to take off her wig over health and safety fears

A five-year-old schoolgirl from St Helens who suffers from a hair loss condition, has been asked by her teachers to remove her wig over health and safety fears.

Whilst taking part in a PE lesson at her primary school, Apryl Corbett was asked to take her wig off during the lesson because it could be dangerous for the other pupils if it fell off.

The 5 year-old’s mum, Lianne, aged 27, was left furious with the school after the incident.

5 year-old schoolgirl told to remove her wig over health and safety fears

A 5 year-old schoolgirl from St Helens who suffers from alopecia made to remove wig by teachers over health and safety fears © Copyright Sue Adair and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Mum and daughter both suffer with alopecia and Lianne said that Apryl was left “humiliated” after she was told by teachers that her wig was “not part of her school uniform”.

5 year-old Apryl has been suffering from alopecia for a year now and has 14 bald patches.

Apryl’s mum Lianne noticed her daughter was suffering from alopecia after seeing a bald patch but kept it to herself for a while but other children saw the patch.

Young Apryl begged her Mum for a wig so that the other children would not “call her names again”.

According to Apryl’s mum, the school said that Apryl was more than happy to take her wig off but when they got home, Apryl said how sad she was because she didn’t want anybody to see her hair.

Apryl wore a hat when she returned to school after the Christmas holidays but was told to take it off, so her Mum bought the wig for her daughter. Only half an hour into the school day, Lianne received a phone call from staff telling her the wig was “not school uniform”.

Lianne told the school she wasn’t happy about it and to stop any bullying she would take Apryl home.

“They were persistent that she could not wear it,” said Lianne, who is now thinking of removing her daughter from the school permanently.

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Health and safety failings lead to prison term for manager

Manager of UK-based company found guilty of health and safety breaches after death of a worker

A two year jail term has been handed out to the manager of a UK-based access rental company over health and safety breaches, which led to the death of one worker and left another man with serious injuries.

Donald Craig, aged 57, was found guilty of breaching health and safety legislation’s at Airdrie Sheriff Court, Scotland, following a 16 day trial and given the maximum penalty.

The incident in question happened on June 20, 2012. Safety net rigger, Gary Currie and Alexander Nisbet, who was contracted by Craig Services & Access as a self-employed operator, were in the basket of the platform taking netting off the facade on the Buchanan House office block, on Port Dundas Road in the city centre of Glasgow. The third main boom section gave way and caused the basket to fall 92 ft to the ground.

Health and safety failings lead to prison term for manager

Manager of a UK-based company found guilty of health and safety breaches after the death of a worker
© Copyright Steve Fareham and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Mr Nisbet was left seriously injured and Mr Currie suffered fatal injuries as a result of the fall.

The company, which is based in Hamilton, was also found guilty on three other charges which related to the collapsing of a mobile elevating work platform (MEWP) and for maintenance and useage failings. The firm was fined £61,000.

A £30,000 fine was also handed out to another company, J M Access Solutions, for failing to examine the platform and the critical parts of the system.

An incident involving the same platform occurred back in 2011. Craig Services & Access instructed repairs be made to the platform after the incident to fix a damaged section on the main boom.

Incorrect repairs were made and J M Access Solutions failed to carry out a proper examination of the platform.

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Fine for Muller UK over health and safety failings

Health and safety breaches led to worker’s roof fall and a £400k fine for the company

The dairy manufacturing company Muller UK and Ireland Group LLP, have been fined £400,000 at Manchester Crown Court over health and safety failings, after a worker fell 15ft through a fragile roof panel.

An investigation into the fall was carried out by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The worker was left with serious injuries to his head and body as a result.

The incident occurred on July 8 last year, as the worker, along with two of his colleagues, worked on a routine job changing the refrigeration gas on some chilled storage units at the company’s premises on Lake Road, at Trafford Park.

The men were working in the void of the roof in the chilled store building over the top of the chilled units. One worker stepped onto a fragile panel on the edge of the roof space and fell through the void inbetween the chilled unit and the shell of the building. The worker was left with serious injuries as a result of the incident.

The HSE investigation found that no information had been given to the workers about the fragile panels in the roof, even though they had worked in that area on numerous occasions. The company never carried out a proper risk assessment before the workers entered the area and no adequate health and safety signs, or barriers were placed around the fragile panels.

The company pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974. They were fined £400,000 and made to pay costs of £9,336.90.

Jane Carroll, a HSE Inspector said afterwards: “This case highlights how important it is that a suitable and sufficient risk assessment is undertaken for all work at height and work within roof voids, to identify the potential for fragile panels to be present.”

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Health and Safety investigation following tunnel flood at Boulby potash mine

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) were informed about the incident which took place last week and are now investigating

 

A tunnel flood at the Boulby’s potash mine has led to a health and safety investigation.

The incident happened last Wednesday, December 21, during the early hours in the mine’s ‘tailings tunnel’.

ICL UK who run the company, have stated that no one was injured as a result of the flood.

According to a spokeswoman for the Health and Safety Executive Mines Inspectorate, the HSE have been told about the incident and are now investiagting.

The East Cleveland mine is run by ICL UK Cleveland Potash, who confirmed in a statement that the incident occurred in the early hours whilst routine maintenance work was in progress. An ingress of water was reported to have flooded into the tailings tunnel, which is responsible for carrying water into it and and sewage out of the mine.

Underground pumping from the mine is still in operation and monitoring is being carried out.

Mining work is in progress as normal and the Mines Inspectorate knows of the incident and will also carry out an investigation.

The mine has been the embroiled in a number of health and safety failings this year, one of which resulted in the death of a miner as a result of a gas blow-out.

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Lollipop lady told to stop high-fiving children over health and safety concerns

Parents left furious over health and safety ban stopping Sheila the lollipop lady from high-fiving the kids

A lollipop lady in South Wales has been banned from high-fiving the children over health and safety fears.

Sheila Allen, aged 58, who’s an award winning lollipop lady, has been told that she can no longer high-five the children and must only greet them with a thumbs-up whilst she helps guide them across the road.

Parents are furious over health and safety ban stopping Sheila the lollipop lady from high-fiving the kids

Lollipop lady told to stop high-fiving children over health and safety concerns © Copyright Stefan Czapski and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Sheila, who’s a very popular lollipop lady at the school and has been serving them for over ten years, was told that she must keep her eyes on the road and no let herself be distracted by having to high-five the kids.

The ban comes after complaints were made by a number of grouchy motorists about Sheila high-fiving the children, which they say led to traffic jams. The action to ban the gesture was carried out by bosses from Vale of Glamorgan Council.

The ban has left parents outraged and a campaign has now started to see Sheila’s high-five gesture reinstated.

A number of mums at the school said that the decision was ridiculous and the children couldn’t understand why they can’t greet their lollipop lady with a high-five anymore.

The council have ordered Sheila from discussing the ban, saying that it was important so as to avoid any distractions.

Sheila is now having to refuse the kids high-five gestures so she doesn’t break the new rule. She now keeps one hand behind her back whilst the other hand holds on to her lollipop stick.

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Couple’s doormat confiscated over ‘health and safety’ concerns

They’ve been asked to pay £40 by the council to get their ‘health and safety hazard’ back

A young couple have had their doormat taken off them by the council, who claimed that it was a health and safety risk – they now have to pay £40 to get it back.

They arrived back at their two-bedroomed flat to discover that their doormat had gone and a note had been left by Dacorum Borough Council.

Ashley Tofte and fiancée Jade Bunce, who are both aged 24 and live in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, now have until December 21 to collect their doormat and pay the £40 fee, which according to the note is to cover removal and storage service costs.

The note from the council also read: “It is our legal duty to keep these areas clear of hazards and combustible materials.”

Mr Tofte could not believe it and thought it was one of his neighbours having a joke with the couple. They have appealed the decision, however they still have to collect their doormat and pay the £40 charge.

This is another case of health and safety gone mad, like the refuse collection workers last year in Colchester, who were banned from wearing Christmas hats or any other Christmas attire over health and safety – reason given was that other drivers on the road could be distracted!

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More health and safety measures needed at trampoline parks

Concern over health and safety at trampoline parks in the UK

A number of organisations, which includes the British Gymnastics group, say more health and safety measures are needed at trampoline parks across the UK. The organisations have joined together and come up with a set of guidelines they believe should be put in place to make the parks safer.

In total, 13 organisations are backing the new draft of guidelines, which includes the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) and the International Association of Trampoline Parks.

More health and safety measures needed at trampoline parks

Jumpers Rebound Centre, Medway Park – trampolining © Copyright N Chadwick and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Trampoline parks do have to follow health and safety regulations but no rules are in place when it comes to building the parks and running them.

Angela Nash who runs a trampoline park in Leicestershire called Rebound, says that her main priority is safety and all members of the public using their facilities have to watch a safety briefing video first to show them the do’s and don’ts.

No figures are available to show how many injuries have occurred whilst people have been trampolining but new health and safety measures have been called for after a trampoline park in Dalkeith, Midlothian, recorded over 100 incidents during a three week period in 2015. The park eventually closed its doors.

As soon as the guidelines are concluded, RoSPA said they want all existing trampoline parks to confirm their compliance the the new guidelines within an 18 month period.

The number of trampoline parks springing up across England and Wales has shot up from only six in 2014, to around 100 this year, according to the International Association of Trampoline Parks. Indoor trampoline parks usually consist of a number of trampolines lined up next to one another and can also include bridges, slides and see-saws to jump off from.

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Heinz Beans advert banned over health and safety fears

The #CanSong advert banned over health and safety concerns

 

The Can Song advert by Heinz has been banned for encouraging behaviour which could lead to the risk of cuts and for health and safety reasons, the advert can no longer be shown on TV.

In the advert, viewers are shown how to use an empty can of Heinz baked beans to tap out the rhythm of a tune followed by the catchline “Learn the #CanSong”.

Heinz beans advert banned over health and safety fears

Heinz beans #CanSong banned over health and safety fears © Copyright Gary Rogers and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

However, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), have banned the advert because of the “associated risk of cuts”.

The advert received nine viewer complaints saying that it encouraged “unsafe practice” and a further six viewers said the advert showed behaviour that could prove dangerous for youngsters to mimmick.

In response to the complaints and subsequent ban, Heinz said that the people in the advert were shown to be tapping on “safe” surfaces of the can; the sealed top, bottom and sides and never shows any of the actors placing their hands into an open can.

They also stated that consumers of their baked beans had been uploading their own can song versions on social media websites, “which was evidence that copying the advert was not prejudicial to their health or safety”.

The ASA however, said that consumers were probably not going to be as good as the actors in the advert at flipping and spinning the can and as a result, it was possible that a mistake could be made whilst using the empty can to copy the advert and fingers or hands placed into the can could end up with cuts.

According to the ASA, the advert never gave instructions to viewers about how to make the can safe before using to play the can song and as a result the ASA decision was that the advert “condoned and encouraged behaviour that prejudiced health and safety.”

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Prison officers striking on health and safety grounds forced back to work

Under current laws, it is illegal for prison officers to strike or for anyone to induce striking action

A 24-hour protest staged by the nation’s prison officers on account of health and safety concerns, was cut short by the High Court after the justice secretary, Elizabeth Truss, took legal action to prevent the issue from spiralling out of control.

The prison officers involved in the protest were encouraged to strike by the Prison Officers’ Association (POA), which has said that the prison system in England and Wales is going through a “meltdown” process amid rising violence, which is creating health and safety issues.

Government council said POA was using the striking action to “impose their own limited regime” on the prison system in direct opposition to the Prison Service.

Health and safety fuelled striking action stopped following High Court legal action

Prison officers staged protests outside their jails. Photo: © Copyright Ian S

On Tuesday last week, Mr Justice Kerr granted the government an injunction to prevent any further strike action, which the justice secretary labelled “unlawful”, as she denounced POA for their “disgraceful” behaviour.

Under the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994, it is illegal for prison officers to carry out industrial striking action and for anyone to induce prison officers into industrial striking action.

Following the High Court ruling, a spokesperson for the Ministry of Justice said: “The injunction prevents the POA and any of its officials including local officials from inducing, authorising or supporting any form of industrial action by any prison officer which would disrupt the normal running of the prison service in England and Wales.”

During the 24-hour strike, prisoners were locked in their cells while striking prison officers protested outside their jails. Michael Spurr, chief executive of the National Offender Management Service, said this can lead to a “dangerous” environment.

Court proceedings in England and Wales were abandoned due to a lack of security, including that of Thomas Mair who is charged with the murder of MP Jo Cox.

Bob Neill, from the Justice Select Committee, joined Truss in her condemnation of POA, but he said that Truss should accept that there are problems within the prison system, including severe understaffing, which need to be addressed as a matter of urgency.

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Health and safety fears on Southern Rail network

Commuters say overcrowding and “mass panic” in crowds are unsatisfactory health and safety risks

Commuters using the Southern Rail network have warned that dangerous overcrowding and “mass panic” in crowds are unsatisfactory health and safety risks and not acceptable conditions for the public to have to deal with.

The Association of British Commuters (ABC), said they’ve been “inundated” with even more reports as a result of the long-running strike action and have asked the Department for Transport (DfT) whether these health and safety risks mean the franchise should be terminated.

Health and safety fears on Southern Rail network

Brighton Railway Station © Copyright Nigel Thompson and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Southern Rail said that the safety of their passengers was a priority and on strike days the company used extra staff at their busiest stations.

In a statement the company said: “When stations do get busy, such as in times of disruption, our staff’s priority is to ensure our passengers can get on and off trains safely – which sometimes necessitates holding passengers back from the platform.”

Lawyers for ABC have written to the Department for Transport to find out whether they carried out any risk assessments before the strikes began.

There were reports of numerous incidents including dangerous overcrowding, “mass panic” in the crowds, violence at Brighton station and a child being abandoned on a platform, plus two reports of trains driving through stations when they should have stopped.

In a statement, the DfT said that improving rail services for passengers using the Southern Rail network was their first concern.

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